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Thread: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,122

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    I started with a cheap pump to start hunting eight years ago (SXP) and after three years of it I decided to upgrade to a semi after my partner also got a semi so it was a bit of an arms race.

    I put about four years into a Winchester SX4. It's a nice light semi that shoots pretty fast. However, I got a bit of money recently from work and decided to splurge on a step up. Same family - Browning - and same choke system. So I've been shooting a Browning Maxus 2 since the start of duck season and so far it's been pretty good. Even though both are gas operated, the Maxus 2 has a bit of a kick to it and also shoots lower than I am used to. But I'm getting used to it and it has a couple bells and whistles more than the SX4. It has a magazine cut off so that if you are shooting duck loads and a flight of geese comes on you; you can rack out the chambered shell and quickly throw in a BB. Nice in theory but I've yet to do it. The other feature is that if you run dry, you don't have to put one in the ejection port and chamber it (two motions). Instead you can shove one into the loading port and it will be sucked up automatically and chambered. Again nice in theory but that function hasn't been as reliable as it seemed when I tried it out at the store.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    990

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    Had them all, inertia guns tend to have more recoil ,as they are inertia driven ,gas guns lesson recoil but must be kept clean although I have seen my partners Beretta a 400 stop working having never been cleaned in a year.I shot a Browning gold for years great gun still have one in 20g ,Beretta 400 ,benelli SBE, all good with their plusses and minus .Now have a Savage renegauge ,got it cheap it is a gas gun does have very little kick ,not 3.5" which is a negative but has an interchangeable stock with different pads and comb heights which I find is a plus, considering the different gear I wear . One other thing in the really cold and snowy ? days switch to my o/u Browning always works even if it's only a 2 holer cheers D

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    LML
    Posts
    160

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    All good info but no one has mentioned fit. If gun doesn’t fit you properly you’re going to miss more than hitting your target Try out different shotguns first

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    3,913

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    Quote Originally Posted by Modeltwelve View Post
    All good info but no one has mentioned fit. If gun doesn’t fit you properly you’re going to miss more than hitting your target Try out different shotguns first
    Yeah. I had a nice Browning Gold Hunter I loved to shoot but couldn't hit anything with it. Sold it and went back to my 870.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Changing diapers
    Posts
    1,099

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    Quote Originally Posted by dak0ta View Post
    3" chamber with interchangeable chokes, and weighing in the 7-8 lb range with a 28" barrel is a pretty good start. I like pump-action guns for the reliability. One that takes down for easy cleaning is also recommended.
    Yes, yes, yes and yes

    Winchester SXP Camp/Field combo 28" and 10" barrels (turkey/slug barrels available at Valley Firearms trail $125/$175 respectively)

    first "new" shotgun i ever bought to replace an older fixed choke 2 3/4" 30" barrel wingmaster (that still shoots!)
    purchased for $499 from Reliable in Surrey

    been in service for 15 years

    never an issue

    good luck
    Links

    Ps there are plenty of incredibly lightly used shotguns out there, bought during the "Duck Dynasty" years and never made it past the skeet pit

    PPS youtube any model you are interested in for a variety of opinions in various situations
    "Just ask anybody who packs a 338... the 30-06 will bounce off a grizzly!"

    "I am not here to awaken sheep, I am here to awaken sleeping lions" Husky7mm

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    990

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    Quote Originally Posted by Modeltwelve View Post
    All good info but no one has mentioned fit. If gun doesn’t fit you properly you’re going to miss more than hitting your target Try out different shotguns first
    Yes absolutely and shame on me for missing that ,fit is number one ,the balancing act is fit well and stay in budget .Hate to spend a ton on something that ends up being a safe queen.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    skeena river valley
    Posts
    2,030

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    Can a person have an older fixed choke (f) barrel fitted to use replaceable chokes?

    Gun is a Beretta A-M-300.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    990

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    Yes you can but it could be cost Prohibitive. I had a couple of my old Winchesters reamed out to Mod. And IC was cheaper and they work well with the 2-4 steel .

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    kamloops
    Posts
    853

    Re: Considerations for a waterfowl shotgun?

    A semi works well for waterfowl hunting as it absorbs some of the recoil of those heavy loads. I'd stick with a B gun (Browning, beretta or benelli) whichever fits you the best.

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