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Thread: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    428

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Quote Originally Posted by curly top View Post
    Just finished watching a terrific show on Waterton Lakes area and the G Bear management program. Through the show, various HUGE FARMS, Cattle RANCHES are in what is called the Biosphere area, just outside the park. This in connection with the Nature Conservatory of Canada. Guess what, through growth of poplar trees invading the ranch land, the ranchers, to keep the trees in check, and gave the cattle stop the trees, placed several salt blocks throughout this area. This same area is frequented by at times huge heards of Elk and White Tail deer. The Nature Conservatory of Canada involved.
    So before those opposed to our little spreads of bait with hay alphalfa mix, some apples, COB ...... Again NO comparison to the Texas Tower Drop station or those supplying feed year round.
    The crazy thing is we as hunters have a choice to bait and possibly screw things up. Some choose to take the baiting game to any level 1 pound of feed or 20 pounds.... does that make one ok and the other not.
    What you give a ungulate may be enough to kill it without even knowing. Predation, CWD, Body Digestive System, the list goes on.

    I guess until the effects are fully understood the questions will continue to haunt us all.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3,435

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Bownut..careful or you will get what you want. Low densities of ungulates to limit spread of cwd. Is that not the management strategy? Maybe we are already there?
    It is well to try and journey ones road and to fight with the air.Man must die! At worst he can die a little sooner." (H Ryder Haggard)

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,632

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Does BC have a plan IF Cwd is found?

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    813

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Buffalo View Post
    Does BC have a plan IF Cwd is found?
    The short answer is no, but I am sure the scientists working for government would appreciate support for moving in that direction. I think there are three animal health specialist working for F&W, and one is on mat leave until this time next year, and of course we all know about the state of funding for F&W.
    Last edited by 2chodi; 12-21-2017 at 11:26 AM.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    813

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    CWD segment on CBC The Current this AM. The CWD segment starts at the 47 minute mark.

    https://podcast-a.akamaihd.net/mp3/p...1221_36204.mp3

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,047

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Chronic Wasting Disease
    The symptoms don't sound much different than some of us humans getting old

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    471

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Quote Originally Posted by Sofa King View Post
    offer me a guaranteed leh.
    of my choice

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2023
    Posts
    4

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Hello everyone. My name is Jake Hubner. I am not affiliated with the government but I am collaborating on the Chronic Wasting Disease Monitoring Program, primarily within the Okanagan. Having recently discovered this forum, I wanted to provide an update on CWD in BC and make sure folks know how the Program has been expanded and improved over the years.

    First off, we are still collecting samples/heads for testing. As many as we can, all across the province. Sample submission is mandatory in 11 MUs in Region 4. CWD infected animals have been detected within natural range of the BC border, so the areas adjacent to Alberta and Montana are highest risk. However, as people have mentioned in this thread, there is also a risk of CWD arriving from carcasses transported from Alberta or other CWD-positive areas into BC. If this happens, the disease could appear anywhere. With this in mind, we are trying to get a baseline number of heads from each region through voluntary submissions in order to have a level of confidence that our wild populations are CWD-free. For example, the Okanagan target is 300 heads per year.

    Hunters can contribute by dropping off the de-antlered head of a harvested deer, elk, or moose at one of our many freezer locations across the province (a full list can be found at https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/e...ce-and-testing). We’re adding freezers every year and will update the site accordingly when we do. For those interested in mounting the skull plate (any animal) or a European-style mount (deer only), this is also possible. The tissues we test are found in the back of the throat for deer and at the base of the skull for elk and moose, meaning you can remove the skull plate before submitting. For deer you can also just submit the low jaw with tissues (tonsils and lymph nodes) at the back of the throat.

    All you need to do at the freezer is fill out a short ear tag with your contact info and the general area you shot your animal, zip-tie the tag to the head, and drop the bagged head off in the freezer (all these supplies will be available at the freezer). Make sure to keep your tag number so you can check out the results on our website once the results come in. Wildlife Health would only contact you directly if a test came up positive.

    CWD is a very concerning disease that’s at BC’s doorstep. Preemptive detection and swift action can make the difference between keeping long-term prevalence rates low and having them get out of control. We have been able to learn a lot from the approaches and results of other states and provinces. If you’re interested, you can look at the recently updated monitoring and management plan here: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/e...disease/cwd-bc

    We don’t have all the answers about CWD, but I’m happy to address questions or thoughts. Thanks for reading this update.
    Last edited by BC-CWD; 08-10-2023 at 09:54 AM. Reason: Slightly reworded to make it clear that I am not a government employee.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Williams Lake, BC Canada
    Posts
    14,179

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    hmmm had a draw in southern Alberta...buck looked fine however tested positive..head /meat was retrieved and incinerated at local co-gen plant.
    on another hunt north of Quesnel noticed a emaciated bone RACK ELK..so far gone he was staggering..2 hours on the phone couldnt find anyone interested in the sick elk.gotta be better than that..
    good luck on the project to deal with this issue.
    cheers
    Steven

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Surrounded by Socialists
    Posts
    7,931

    Re: BC Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Program

    Quote Originally Posted by BC-CWD View Post
    Hello everyone. My name is Jake Hubner and I am working with Provincial Wildlife Health on CWD monitoring, primarily as the Okanagan CWD Program coordinator. Having recently discovered this forum, I wanted to provide an update on CWD in BC and make sure folks know how weve expanded and improved the Program over the years.

    First off, we are still collecting samples/heads for testing. As many as we can, all across the province. Sample submission is mandatory in 11 MUs in Region 4. CWD infected animals have been detected within natural range of the BC border, so the areas adjacent to Alberta and Montana are highest risk. However, as people have mentioned in this thread, there is also a risk of CWD arriving from carcasses transported from Alberta or other CWD-positive areas into BC. If this happens, the disease could appear anywhere. With this in mind, we are trying to get a baseline number of heads from each region through voluntary submissions in order to have a level of confidence that our wild populations are CWD-free. For example, our Okanagan target is 300 heads per year.

    Hunters can contribute by dropping off the de-antlered head of a harvested deer, elk, or moose at one of our many freezer locations across the province (a full list can be found at https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/e...ce-and-testing). Were adding freezers every year and will update the site accordingly when we do. For those interested in mounting the skull plate (any animal) or a European-style mount (deer only), this is also possible. The tissues we test are found in the back of the throat for deer and at the base of the skull for elk and moose, meaning you can remove the skull plate before submitting. For deer you can also just submit the low jaw with tissues (tonsils and lymph nodes) at the back of the throat.

    All you need to do at the freezer is fill out a short ear tag with your contact info and the general area you shot your animal, zip-tie the tag to the head, and drop the bagged head off in the freezer (all these supplies will be available at the freezer). Make sure to keep your tag number so you can check out the results on our website once the results come in. We would only contact you directly if a test came up positive.

    CWD is a very concerning disease thats at BCs doorstep. Preemptive detection and swift action can make the difference between keeping long-term prevalence rates low and having them get out of control. We have been able to learn a lot from the approaches and results of other states and provinces. If youre interested, you can look at our recently updated monitoring and management plan here: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/e...disease/cwd-bc

    We dont have all the answers about CWD, but Im happy to address questions or thoughts. Thanks for reading this update.
    Hi Jake,

    Thanks for the update.

    Here's a question for you. How come we haven't built a wildlife fence along our borders with Montana, Idaho, Washington and Alberta? Yes I understand it would be very expensive and difficult terrain to navigate in certain areas, but its certainly possible to do. It seems to me that if the Province was genuinely serious about preventing CWD infected deer from entering the province, a logical first step would be to prevent any deer from any of those states and Alberta from being able to cross our border and enter the province by building a rugged durable impenetrable fence.

    Why aren't we at the very least contemplating something like this? I understand that the border with the states would be federal jurisdiction and might make it harder to build a fence, but why not just build the fence back a few meters on our side of the border so it wouldn't interfere with the international border? Yes some migratory animals may suffer from not being able to cross back and forth but that is a small price to pay to ensure BC remains CWD free.

    What am I missing here?
    "It is the first responsibility of every citizen to question authority." - Benjamin Franklin

    "The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it" - George Orwell

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