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Thread: Goose chair or layout blind.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Ladner, B.C.
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    498

    Re: Goose chair or layout blind.

    Quote Originally Posted by jethro View Post
    The key to keeping your toes and your dog alive in a layout is to ensure the muzzle is always outside the blind. keep your gun's barrel on the gun rest with the tip of the barrel pointing outside the doors. It seems like common sense but I guess some people can't figure it out.
    The best gun position for layout blind or boat is laying across your chest with the barrel sticking out over your left shoulder (for righties) with left hand around the forearm and right hand on the pistol grip---gives you the best control of the muzzle and where its pointing and lets you get on the bird as you sit up much more quickly and instinctively

  2. #12
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    Sep 2006
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    Maple Bay
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    319

    Re: Goose chair or layout blind.

    The best gun position for layout blind or boat is laying across your chest with the barrel sticking out over your left shoulder (for righties) with left hand around the forearm and right hand on the pistol grip---gives you the best control of the muzzle and where its pointing and lets you get on the bird as you sit up much more quickly and instinctively
    I think I would rather have the gun pointed at my toes than my head.
    You would have to sit pretty still to have a gun laying across your chest.
    In a layout blind the target will be in front of you, not behind you.
    I think that is why it is called a gun rest.
    Hooked on quack.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Ladner, B.C.
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    498

    Re: Goose chair or layout blind.

    Quote Originally Posted by HuntNHookSports View Post
    I think I would rather have the gun pointed at my toes than my head.
    You would have to sit pretty still to have a gun laying across your chest.
    In a layout blind the target will be in front of you, not behind you.
    I think that is why it is called a gun rest.
    1)You obviously haven't been hunting out of a layout setup for 40 yrs.
    2)What kind of a fool would point his gun at his toes?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Pacific Flyway
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    1,822

    Re: Goose chair or layout blind.

    I've never thought about pointing it backwards, maybe becuase you know whats it front of you and if somebody walked in from behind the barrell not pointing right at them. Its not like the end of the barrell is resting on your foot where if it went off it would blow a couple toes off. The barrel is past my foot by a couple inches and will sit there all day and I dont have to worry about it.

    Another thing about having it across your chest is when you're calling, you normally use two hands and that wouldnt be a pretty sight holding a call and you're pretty much hugging the barrel, where as with it pointing after your toes the stock is always right there on my hip and easy to pick up.
    1st Im in charge, and if not Matt is. Your job is to sign checks, tell us we're doing good and open your case of scotch after a good day. 2nd my fee. You can keep it, all I want in exchange for my service is the right to hunt all the drakes. A male. Buck only. Why and how are my business. If you don't like it, go alone. Set up right here or in a swamp or in the middle of a noshoot field for all I care. I've been on too many duck hunts with rich dentists to listen to any more suicidal ideas. Ok?

  5. #15
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    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ladner, B.C.
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    498

    Re: Goose chair or layout blind.

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy_Farmer View Post
    I've never thought about pointing it backwards, maybe becuase you know whats it front of you and if somebody walked in from behind the barrell not pointing right at them. Its not like the end of the barrell is resting on your foot where if it went off it would blow a couple toes off. The barrel is past my foot by a couple inches and will sit there all day and I dont have to worry about it.

    Another thing about having it across your chest is when you're calling, you normally use two hands and that wouldnt be a pretty sight holding a call and you're pretty much hugging the barrel, where as with it pointing after your toes the stock is always right there on my hip and easy to pick up.
    You are right of course in pointing out that no one is going to actually rest the barrel on their foot and it's equally obvious that with the gun laying across the chest it isn't pointed at the shooter's head, but rather rests with the stock at about ear level and the end of the barrel extending well out beyond ones head. With regard to the safety issue of where the gun is pointed relative to others it seems to me that if it "sits there all day" (ie. pointed straight out over the decoys, assuming that's how you orient your blind relative to the decoys) then its going to be constantly pointed at you or your partners or your dog as they come and go adjusting the set or picking up birds. There are of course many different variables ( not the least of which is how many layouts and hunters are using the set) that will affect how you orient your layout blind, be it a punt or a field set-up. Almost all of my experience has been in punts hunting alone or with one other punt and partner, although I have done field layout shoots a few times for prairie geese (but again, alone, not with 4 or 5 partners as photographed on another thread). I call snows around here by voice so a call is not an issue there and I don't use a call for ducks. I have used a call for prairie geese with the gun on my chest and found it not to be a problem.

    For me,the big advantage of the gun-on-chest position is the ease and quickness, and even safety, it brings to sitting up to shoot. The gun is in a natural postion to be raised to the shoulder and end up pointing in the right direction (assuming your shot is somewhere in the quadrant over the decoys). Your hands are already on the gun in shooting position or very near to being in the right postion on the gun if you have to drop a call . I much prefer this to having to fumble around by my side to find the gun grip and pick it up one handed all while in the process of sitting up. If the layout, as do most, has doors, then from the gun-on-chest position your elbows will naturally flip the doors open as you raise the gun from chest to shoulder while simultaneously sitting up. I have used the gun-to-toes position when hunting brant with two guys in the punt, although of course when you're not using a call the pistol grip hand, although not the other , can be on the gun as the birds are coming in. I found it awkward.

    A whole different but somewhat connected issue here is the postioning of the layout (punt or field type) relative to the wind direction and decoy set. Terrain, whether on land or over water, can also be a factor. This is going to be affected, mostly adversely, by the number of layouts shooting over the set. For this discussion I'll assume one layout. Figure out, given all these factors, the location of the quadrant (or hemisphere) where most of your shots are going to be. You then want to postion your layout so that when you sit up gun to shoulder the gun is pointing (assuming you're a righty) at the right hand portion of that area. It is much easier to swing to the left to shoot over the rest of the arc than it is to swing to the right. For example, if you are set up upwind of the decoys and you expect the birds to come into them flying straight upwind then it is a mistake to point your layout right at the decoys because you will find yourself in an unnatural position to shoot at any birds except those that flare to your left. Try this by sitting on the floor and pointing a pretend gun at something directly in front of you (even 15 degrees left of that) or anywhere to the right of that. The best positiuon for your layout in this situation is aligned 45 degrees or more to the right across the wind. Obviously there are too many variables to be dogmatic here or to cover all possible situations but the concept is one that can be crucial to a successful hunt.

    Not trying to persuade or be pushy here, just to share 40 yrs. of experience with those readers who may be new to this game. Trying to persuade someone who has been doing it another way for years would probably be like trying to get a pump gunner to switch to a double, or vicey versey. (but maybe not---I started using a double a few years ago and love it, although I still use both---sometimes it's a good idea to try, or at least consider, new ways of doing things).
    Interestingly, when I joined this site a couple of weeks ago I thought I'd just be a lurker but find myself enjoying the opportunity to write and share experience/s and opinions.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Tsawwassen
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    5,342

    Re: Goose chair or layout blind.

    well said there BrantHunter. I'm with you on the gun on the chest when punt hunting but it's beside me when in a chair ( obviously. We still use four Goose chairs but we dig them down about 8" and they are way more effective than having them just on top of the ground. We set the chairs in amongst a dozen and a half 42" shells and you'd be hard pressed to pick out the chairs. By the time the geese do, it's over. K

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