Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    5,462

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    we also have flying squirrels

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Lumby BC
    Posts
    534

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    As pointed out in a previous post, sometimes there are other valid reasons other than meat hunting for which shooting an animal is warranted. Self protection first comes to mind (example, protection against a bear attack). But, other reasons such as pest or rodent control, is another reason, as well as injured, sick or diseased animals (such as rabies) and other valid reasons.

    Years ago, I had a severe infestation of gray squirrels attacking my orchard. I live in the okanagan and there seems to be a lot of gray squirrels here. Now I tolerated the little creatures for several years as I did not want to bother the little guys. They are cute you know. However, around and in my orchard, I noticed an increasing population of squirrels over time along with a corresponding increase in damage to my apple crop. It got bad. So bad, that the damage to my apple crop reached an estimated 50 percent loss. Just completely unacceptable.

    What the little buggers would do, is they would go up the tree and nibble on an apple creating little bite marks on one apple, then proceed down the branch and nibble on another apple and again and again, until most, if not all apples on the branch had little bite marks on them. This they did to many branches on many trees., This of course would render the apples useless to sell.
    I didn`t even want to consume these apples myself. What with rodents chewing on them. No thanks!

    It was then that I decided I had to take action. The next year I shot dozens of them and it took about about 4 years to clean them up. So, with that in mind, if you are looking to eat them, I am told that they are quite good to eat. A lot of work to shin them in comparison to the amount of meat you get though. I`ll stay with deer.
    On the other hand if you are looking to practice a little and sharpen your hunting skills on smaller critters first before moving up to larger game, here is my 2 cents worth.

    First, don`t start off hunting with the idea that it is ok to shoot any animal just for fun. It should not be this way and don`t let anyone tell you different. Have a valid reason for killing any animal. You can certainly eat them and this will also be good practice for you also. Skinning, cooking and proper care of meat. If you don`t want to eat them, then perhaps check out some orchardists who may also be experiencing damage from squirrels. They may be willing to let you help them. And who knows, perhaps they also have a deer damage problem and may be open to allowing you to hunt deer at some point later.
    Good luck and welcome to our hunting community!

    Note: I also have flying squirrels on my property. They only come out after sunset though. Funny thing is, After shooting off most of the gray squirrels, I noticed an increase in their numbers. Yet, no damage to my apples. They are welcomed here. Seems like they don't like the grays either.
    Always EXPECT the UNEXPECTED!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    LM
    Posts
    855

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    It's interesting see that no one called out this first time poster requesting a joke as per the usual standard when joining the Forum.

    I think it's because he was asking about squirrels.....if he asking about elk or moose, whoa! that's another matter...lol

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    5,462

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    As you probably know, some birds will also do the peck-peck on green fruit....I am almost certain it is to make them turn -again, as you have probably noticed, fruit that is damaged by pests or disease will ripen much earlier providing ripe food to them before the regular ripening would occur.....
    Quote Originally Posted by hunterdon View Post
    As pointed out in a previous post, sometimes there are other valid reasons other than meat hunting for which shooting an animal is warranted. Self protection first comes to mind (example, protection against a bear attack). But, other reasons such as pest or rodent control, is another reason, as well as injured, sick or diseased animals (such as rabies) and other valid reasons.

    Years ago, I had a severe infestation of gray squirrels attacking my orchard. I live in the okanagan and there seems to be a lot of gray squirrels here. Now I tolerated the little creatures for several years as I did not want to bother the little guys. They are cute you know. However, around and in my orchard, I noticed an increasing population of squirrels over time along with a corresponding increase in damage to my apple crop. It got bad. So bad, that the damage to my apple crop reached an estimated 50 percent loss. Just completely unacceptable.

    What the little buggers would do, is they would go up the tree and nibble on an apple creating little bite marks on one apple, then proceed down the branch and nibble on another apple and again and again, until most, if not all apples on the branch had little bite marks on them. This they did to many branches on many trees., This of course would render the apples useless to sell.
    I didn`t even want to consume these apples myself. What with rodents chewing on them. No thanks!

    It was then that I decided I had to take action. The next year I shot dozens of them and it took about about 4 years to clean them up. So, with that in mind, if you are looking to eat them, I am told that they are quite good to eat. A lot of work to shin them in comparison to the amount of meat you get though. I`ll stay with deer.
    On the other hand if you are looking to practice a little and sharpen your hunting skills on smaller critters first before moving up to larger game, here is my 2 cents worth.

    First, don`t start off hunting with the idea that it is ok to shoot any animal just for fun. It should not be this way and don`t let anyone tell you different. Have a valid reason for killing any animal. You can certainly eat them and this will also be good practice for you also. Skinning, cooking and proper care of meat. If you don`t want to eat them, then perhaps check out some orchardists who may also be experiencing damage from squirrels. They may be willing to let you help them. And who knows, perhaps they also have a deer damage problem and may be open to allowing you to hunt deer at some point later.
    Good luck and welcome to our hunting community!

    Note: I also have flying squirrels on my property. They only come out after sunset though. Funny thing is, After shooting off most of the gray squirrels, I noticed an increase in their numbers. Yet, no damage to my apples. They are welcomed here. Seems like they don't like the grays either.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Lumby BC
    Posts
    534

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    When it comes to apples specifically, any damage from critters chewing on them is detrimental. Most varieties of apples, with few exceptions are very prone to oxidation damage, (browning) once the protective layer of skin is removed. In addition, they not only do NOT ripen earlier, they actually often and I mean very often begin to rot. Mold/fungus will set in, and or little flies will be attracted to the damage area, introducing bacteria and if that's not enough, the yellow jacket wasps will be attracted to the damaged area and finish off what's left of the apple. They love rotting fruit. In short, bad news all around.

    But you may right that some fruit will ripen quicker. Such as cherries. The problem there is, if that happens to any large extent, this will make it very difficult for orchardists to pick the fruit, as some cherries will be ripe while other berries will be overripe. Not good either.
    Always EXPECT the UNEXPECTED!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Surrey, BC
    Posts
    11,111

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    are you brewing any liquor from them apples? for medicinal purposes of course
    1. Human over population
    2. Government burden and overreach

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    By the beach in the Van.
    Posts
    5,933

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    Who would have known there was a World Championship Squirrel Cookoff?

    https://www.themeateater.com/hunt/sm...ookoff-recipes

    Rinella has a few episodes where he hunts squirrels and cooks them up afterwards. Lots of recipes on his site.

    https://www.themeateater.com/cook/re...-rabbit-recipe

    https://www.themeateater.com/cook/re...-rollup-recipe

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Lumby BC
    Posts
    534

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    Quote Originally Posted by adriaticum View Post
    are you brewing any liquor from them apples? for medicinal purposes of course
    Well, I'm retired now and have not been commercially growing any fruit for several years now. Actually, many of the original trees have died either from disease, animal damage, old age or simply neglect on my part. I did remove/allow the largest part of the orchard to be used to support the deer. That part the original orchard is theirs now. They do feed on the fruit and twigs mostly during the fall season. My way of giving back to nature I guess. Not just taking.

    But I still do have a smaller orchard, mostly of apples, but also some other fruit such as cherries, plums, pears etc. We grow numerous other small fruit, such as blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, both eating and wine grape varieties and a host of other food items.

    But getting to your question, which is a great question. Yes, I do set aside some apples for fermented apple cider. For health reasons of course! LOL. We have 4 different varieties of apples and the royal gala works best for us. You want a good sweet apple and one that will clear up nice. Granny smiths are not so good, Not as sweet and too much natural pectin making the final product cloudy. I do not use any additives or clarifiers of any kind in our brews. Good and healthy the way our forefathers did it before modern artificial methods.

    We also make both red and amber wine from our own grapes. Really good and yes healthy when drank in moderation. All of our produce is grown truly organically. That is, we actually add large quantities of organic matter to our soils, and not just omit chemical and other harmful products, as so many others do in order to qualify for organic certification.

    Sorry for the long winded answer, but I think your question is a great one and needed more than a simple yes or no, especially since you referenced the health aspect.

    Cheers
    Always EXPECT the UNEXPECTED!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    kamloops
    Posts
    3,187

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    You greenhorns wanted tp get your feet yet..go ground squirrel hunting a farner will thank you..apparently there tasty..

    I just shoot them if they are annoying me but generaly dont. Note only legal on private land in season.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Surrey, BC
    Posts
    11,111

    Re: Hunting squirrels (MU 2-8)

    Quote Originally Posted by hunterdon View Post
    Well, I'm retired now and have not been commercially growing any fruit for several years now. Actually, many of the original trees have died either from disease, animal damage, old age or simply neglect on my part. I did remove/allow the largest part of the orchard to be used to support the deer. That part the original orchard is theirs now. They do feed on the fruit and twigs mostly during the fall season. My way of giving back to nature I guess. Not just taking.

    But I still do have a smaller orchard, mostly of apples, but also some other fruit such as cherries, plums, pears etc. We grow numerous other small fruit, such as blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, both eating and wine grape varieties and a host of other food items.

    But getting to your question, which is a great question. Yes, I do set aside some apples for fermented apple cider. For health reasons of course! LOL. We have 4 different varieties of apples and the royal gala works best for us. You want a good sweet apple and one that will clear up nice. Granny smiths are not so good, Not as sweet and too much natural pectin making the final product cloudy. I do not use any additives or clarifiers of any kind in our brews. Good and healthy the way our forefathers did it before modern artificial methods.

    We also make both red and amber wine from our own grapes. Really good and yes healthy when drank in moderation. All of our produce is grown truly organically. That is, we actually add large quantities of organic matter to our soils, and not just omit chemical and other harmful products, as so many others do in order to qualify for organic certification.

    Sorry for the long winded answer, but I think your question is a great one and needed more than a simple yes or no, especially since you referenced the health aspect.

    Cheers
    Good to know.
    I favour a good medicinal brandy. Apple, pear or plum.
    My family had a good orchard and grew William yellow pears and idared apples specifically for the liquor making.
    My uncle supported his family with this orchard during SHTF times.
    It's hard to find a good brew here. I have found a good plum brandy in liquor stores but can't find any apple or pear.
    Years ago when i travelled back to europe, I'd always bring 2 or 3 bottles. But those folks are now all gone.
    Good pear is a really great brandy.
    1. Human over population
    2. Government burden and overreach

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •