Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    4

    Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    Hi all, I'm a new hunter that's just starting out this season. I've already missed the deer season but was hoping to get some duck hunting in at least once before season ends. From reading around I know that I can hunt at Boundary Bay. I was there a couple of weeks ago and it was swarming with ducks in the early afternoon but the tide looked way too high to get in. I've been looking at the FVSA map and going through some of the posts here on the forums. So my plan is basically:

    • Try to look at the tide chart to see when the tide is relatively low right when the legal shooting time is.
    • Find a place to walk out to and sit in a bush that's far enough away from the dyke (~200m) and other people (before the legal shooting time)
    • Wait..?


    Is..that it? Seems simple enough but not sure if I'm missing anything critical..? Also what are some general etiquette I should know so I don't screw up people's shots or scare the ducks away?

  2. Site Sponsor

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    4

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    Crap should have asked this in the newbie section, my bad.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    637

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    • Try to look at the tide chart to see when the tide is relatively low right when the legal shooting time is.
    • Find a place to walk out to and sit in a bush that's far enough away from the dyke (~200m) and other people (before the legal shooting time)
    • Wait..?
    Short answer is yes to your assumptions, though in my experience BB is quite shallow so when the tide is out it is out all the way the U.S.

    There are plenty of places in the scrub for you to walk out there and you may not need waders at all except when crossing the odd channel. My experience has been at the bottom of 64th and 72nd streets so your mileage may vary. It's a big bay but in those spots I found them very flat and easy to navigate.

    Of course please pay attention to the Fraser Valley Special Area Map that describes in detail the shooting boundaries and make sure you have all your permits in order. You need the Federal migratory bird stamp, you already have your hunting license, and then you need the Fraser Valley Special permit, and proof of insurance plus your firearms license.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    637

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    Etiquette:

    Mainly make sure you are more than 50 yards away from the next hunter and of course MORE space is better. Boundary is wide open so it is very possible. When you walk in watch for lights or decoys and then give them a wide berth. If you see latecomers, don't wait for them to set up. Stand up and give them a wave or flash of your light so they know you are there. Don't make your position a mystery. Keep in mind that people will generally be shooting toward the water or - when allowed - even inland. So set up parallel to them and not in front or behind them. For obvious reasons no one wants to have pellets raining down on them.

    Skybusting is the main pet peeve for everyone. KNOW YOUR RANGE. Let the birds get lower. 30y or closer will ensure easier shots for you. No-hoper type shots - especially if you are not sure of your shooting - just educate birds and drive them away. Worse, they could be heading toward your neighbour and you are screwing up their shot. Happens many times in my experience. You see birds that are dropping but still too high for your skybusting neighbour but they let fly and from your perspective they could be 100yards high. No hope! And then the birds that may have dropped within your range are now scattered and don't return to the area for days.

    When collecting birds try to wait until the sky is clear before heading out so you don't screw it up for the other hunters. That said, cripples will make a run for it so by all means swat them and put them down or run out there and tackle the bird.

    If in doubt about something walk out and talk to your neighbour and ask them "am I too close?" "Was that my bird or yours?" Don't grumble and assume. You may make a friend. I know I've picked up a couple hunting buddies just from meeting them in the swamp.
    Last edited by silveragent; 01-04-2021 at 09:19 AM.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    4

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    Wow thanks so much for the detailed response, this is better than I could have hoped for!

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Squamish
    Posts
    5,657

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    Well said SilverAgent! I could have really used that kind of advice when I started.

    Oscargot, do you have access to a boat? I know a little about hunting the Ladner marsh that I would be willing to share but a boat is a must for access and bird retrieval.
    Is Justin Competent, or just incompetent?

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    4

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    I unfortunately do not

    Quote Originally Posted by albravo2 View Post
    Well said SilverAgent! I could have really used that kind of advice when I started.

    Oscargot, do you have access to a boat? I know a little about hunting the Ladner marsh that I would be willing to share but a boat is a must for access and bird retrieval.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    637

    Re: Basic beginner question for Boundary Bay

    You can shoot Brunswick Pt without a dog or boat as long as you shoot conservatively. It's a bit of a slog to get out to the water's edge and it can get pretty hairy at high tides. Sunday for example my group got thoroughly soaked. We might as well have had wet suits on so good waders are a must if you want to shoot a real tidal marsh. Stick to the south part of the Pt. The bay is a bit shallower there so a bit more leeway to wade out to retrieve birds. Without a boat or dog I would avoid the north part of the Pt as there are some deep channels you can step into that will put you above your head. Again, Boundary is much easier to get in and out to.

    Inland there you can still shoot and stay dry but with less predictability of birds and - again - keep a lookout for other hunters as you don't want to be shooting over the heads of the ones who are at the water's edge. Also that swamp has become very popular with birders so you want to be careful not to get into conflict with them as they have every right to be there as you. Imagine how much fuss a photographer with their expensive camera might raise publicly if they were to claim someone was shooting at them. And with their long lens you can be sure they have the ability to scope any kind of perceived bad behaviour. Speaking of that, NRO, COs and other officers do check there so make sure you have your papers on you.

    Ladner swamp also is home to a couple dozen or more swans. Unfortunately, some new hunters have taken some - including this year - by mistaking them for snow geese. If you are not sure the difference, just don't go after snowies until you can spot them from far away. The season is ended for snowies here now so you can use this time to get more experience recognizing them. There is also a colony of cormorants there so again make sure you can tell the difference between cormorants and other large ducks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •