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Thread: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    9

    Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    I am new to bow hunting in Region 8. I've been looking at tree stands; ground blinds; spot and stalk techniques for Mule deer. I am interested to know what everyone here prefer to do for deer in Region 8.

    Cheers

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Kootenays
    Posts
    4,185

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    Tree stand is, the most effective method to harvest deer. Any morning or afternoon in the stand can be very relaxing. The stand allows you to spend time in the stand visualizing the shot, minimize your movement, prepare for a shot as the animals move in, remain undetected until all the conditions for a shot are right. The tree stand increases your odds of a good harvest. The tree stand allows you to control so many of the variables.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    828

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    The above is pretty accurate. However I'm going to counter with the idea that you should pursue the technique that is most enjoyable to you. Spot and stalk is my personal favorite, because it is almost the exact opposite of tree stand hunting. You don't get to preplan and eliminate variables but for the most part have to use the skills you aquire (through mostly heartbreak, stupid archery) to close the deal.

    Spot and stalk also gives you access to more places that are not suitable to tree stand hunting.

    Follow your personal preference on how you'd like to spend your days the succes will follow.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    9

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    I am going to try both techniques. Been thinking about packing a tree saddle/climbing sticks with me while spotting and stalking deer. That would give me more options depending on the terrain.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    kamloops
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    2,940

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    practice practice practice..


    even if its just into dirt in the back yard or a backstop in the basement shoot daily for a couple months leading up to sept 1

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Lumby BC
    Posts
    503

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    There is another alternative to tree stand or spot and stalk. That is a ground blind. It's a somewhat in between the 2. I have used all 3 methods with success. However, ground blinds remains my choice of preference, particularly for whitetail.

    Now, you can buy a ground blind or you can make one with materials from the forest. A combination of both would be best for you if you choose this method.
    If you do eventually buy a ground blind, it will much more effective if you take advantage of the natural surroundings. Say tucked in a bit with trees surrounding your blind as to break up its view to the animal. Don't set it up in a wide open area. Also stand tree branches around the blind to break up the view of the blind. Just be sure not to block your shooting window. Doing these things will make your setup much more effective.

    Not everyone can sit still in a tree stand for very long, or feel comfortable about heights. If you can do this it can be effective. Likewise, although I can walk slowly and quietly quite well and have had good success at spot and stalk, a lot of people who use spot and stalk are not effective at this because they walk in the bush like they walk on the city streets. They are clumsy, noisy and walk way too fast.

    Another advantage of ground blinds is that you can make movements inside the blind without being seen from the outside, provided of course you don't do this right in front of your viewing window, should a set of eyes bee looking your way. It is also warmer than on a tree-stand. A very nice feature that I appreciate particularly on those late season cold windy days. Even a small insignificant breeze will cool you down.

    Hope that helps, and great question. I'm sure others had the same question.
    Shoot straight......Don
    Always EXPECT the UNEXPECTED!

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    828

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    Quote Originally Posted by Nero View Post
    I am going to try both techniques. Been thinking about packing a tree saddle/climbing sticks with me while spotting and stalking deer. That would give me more options depending on the terrain.
    I would actually recommend keeping your hunting techniques "seperate" for a lack of a better word. I feel like if you spot and stalk and saddle at the same time you're doing both half way, rather focus 100% on either or during your hunt

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Kootenays
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    4,185

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    I agree, spot and stalk, particularly for mule deer can be a great hunt. I think the approach might depend on the time of year you are hunting. A question to ask yourself, how close do you think you need to be, to be able to take the shot? And then, depending on the terrain, the availability of cover or trees, that might help you determine the best approach.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    828

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    Quote Originally Posted by J_T View Post
    I agree, spot and stalk, particularly for mule deer can be a great hunt. I think the approach might depend on the time of year you are hunting. A question to ask yourself, how close do you think you need to be, to be able to take the shot? And then, depending on the terrain, the availability of cover or trees, that might help you determine the best approach.
    This is an excellent point, to be able to spot and stalk effectively being proficient with a bow is a must...I regularly practice out past a 100 yards, no I wouldn't shoot an animal that far but you should be practicing around twice as far as you plan to shoot

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    9

    Re: Bow Hunting Styles Region 8

    Going to do some practice scouting the areas to get the feel of the terrain. And hopefully find some nice spots for the fall. Thank you all for your input.

    Happy hunting.

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