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Thread: BC moose hunting history

  1. #1
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    BC moose hunting history

    Hmmmmmm been reading why and how much allocation of our moose supply is going to the natives.
    that chief Joe et all want 100 % of the moose reserved just for indians, their culture, ceremonies, sustenance. .sales..oops..
    Got me thinking....
    Moose are not known to be part of historical ceremonial tradition or substenance use in all or any of first nations contacted so far in BC.
    YOU will not see a moose on a ceremonial totem pole hmmmmm why if they are SO important to their culture, ceremony, survival...hmmmmmm
    there has never been any archaeological evidence supporting the moose prior to the 1900, s
    1930..1940..show me the bones. ....
    the word moose was first used in 1930, s..meaning twig eater. .the indians did not even have a name for this new animal.
    Cecil Paul..Haisla elder.." moose were not here or even part of the stories when I was a child "
    Frank Haneuse of Oweekeno nation..estimates their arrival about 1940 .
    How did the natives survive without moose, what did they eat when the moose were not even here ?
    they sure took a liking to them in the subsequent 80 years..so much so they demand them ALL to themselves.
    What a crock of shyte.
    Steven Rupp

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    160

    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Ya I totally agree. I have to dig up the article with the studies done but you're right, little to no moose prior to 1900. So where do the keepers think they can have 100%of moose hunting to themselves? But of course the naive government is willing to play with the idea.

    Outrageous and could rant about it for hours but we all know no one will say boo to the natives.

  4. #3
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    746

    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Very frustrating.... total BS but who will say something and stick up for our own rights ? Our word against theirs ... if someone were to do that it would be racist and completely out of line just disgusting mr Rupp not sure what can be done to stabilize this to an equal ecological reality.

  5. #4
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Just because FN say this or that doesn't mean I believe it, I dont believe in legends let alone laws built on legends.
    I guess what I mean is....I dont believe anything they say, anything, if they said there were moose, or no moose.

    There were Moose in BC 200 years ago for sure as it was recorded in various fur traders journals, however, I have never read about them in the Chilcotin.....I dont believe in legends.

  6. #5
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Srupp, find a copy of Eric Collierís book, Three Against the Wilderness. It chronicles his life and that of his wife and son at Meldrum Creek. In it he relates a story of the first known moose shot in the area in 1918 by two Indians. As the story goes they had no idea what they had killed having never seen one before. They had no known name for what they had shot.
    Ericís wife was an Indian woman and I believe her father was Chief Alexis whom Alexis Creek was named. Their son was Veasy Collier who served in WW2 and resided in Williams Lake.
    Eric also tells of the reintroduction of beaver to Meldrum Creek that he and Ernie Holmes had facilitated. Ernie was the game warden for the Bowrun Lake area and he live trapped beavers there. This was before that area became a park and pre-dated Wells.
    I knew Ernie quite well as I spent as much free time as I could at his gunsmith shop at Ollala.
    Moose is the Algonquin word for the same animal known as elg in the Northern Europe.
    Manx the first known moose shot this side of the continental divide was in Hazelton in 1910. Also by an Indian.
    In all the stories related to hunting in the Bowrun Lake by gold miners and early settlers I have read or heard of moose there prior to the early 1920ís.
    "Any day above ground is a good one!"
    lip_ripper00 01/07/2019 @ 10:28 AM


    Lest we forget
    Humbolt Broncos Tragedy
    " I'm trying to not get cynical about what is a totally devastating tragedy but the maleness, the youthfullness and the whiteness of the victims are playing a significant role."
    Nora Loreto 6:49 PM 8 Apr. 2018






  7. #6
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Reading 338Magís post where he references moose in BC 200 years prior would most likely be incorrect.
    what is known is that elk were in the area of the Cariboo/Chilcotin.
    Harold Mitchell, head regional biologist for Region 5 back when, was taken to an area by Chilco Choate were there was a large presence of antler he believed was from elk. It was ancient but not fossilized. Mitchell collected samples for testing where it was established that they were elk and carbon dated to the early 1800s. Mitchell speculated there was a mass die off due to severe winter weather conditions around 1813 when it was recorded that the world had 2 years without summer growing seasons and a famine prevailed worldwide. This anomaly was blamed on massive volcanic ash discharge to the atmosphere which blocked the sun from warming the earth.
    I had first hand information on this as I had a quasi working relationship with Harold interrupted by his untimely death in a helicopter crash over in the west Chilcotin.
    "Any day above ground is a good one!"
    lip_ripper00 01/07/2019 @ 10:28 AM


    Lest we forget
    Humbolt Broncos Tragedy
    " I'm trying to not get cynical about what is a totally devastating tragedy but the maleness, the youthfullness and the whiteness of the victims are playing a significant role."
    Nora Loreto 6:49 PM 8 Apr. 2018






  8. #7
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Super interesting thanks for sharing I love the history...
    Yup, it's easier to manage hunters (LEH) than it is to manage wildlife. And, generally, LEH satisfies the Guide Outfitter because it limits the number of hunters in their area.

  9. #8
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Surely someone has compiled historical BC moose distribution and density records for the last 150 years.
    Yes, no?
    If not, it is critical that this work is done with urgency.



    I have always found it interesting to hear reports that moose were not present in large areas of BC in the recent past.
    This doesn't make sense as most of BC is decent moose habitat, and begs the question, WHY?

    It seems to me that current concerns of moose declines would benefit by knowing historical distribution and an understanding of causes that extirpated moose from much of BC


    Regarding allocations, this historical information would compose the foundation for an intervenor to support keeping moose accessible to ALL people.

  10. #9
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Quote Originally Posted by Jagermeister View Post
    Reading 338Mag’s post where he references moose in BC 200 years prior would most likely be incorrect.
    what is known is that elk were in the area of the Cariboo/Chilcotin.
    Harold Mitchell, head regional biologist for Region 5 back when, was taken to an area by Chilco Choate were there was a large presence of antler he believed was from elk. It was ancient but not fossilized. Mitchell collected samples for testing where it was established that they were elk and carbon dated to the early 1800s. Mitchell speculated there was a mass die off due to severe winter weather conditions around 1813 when it was recorded that the world had 2 years without summer growing seasons and a famine prevailed worldwide. This anomaly was blamed on massive volcanic ash discharge to the atmosphere which blocked the sun from warming the earth.
    I had first hand information on this as I had a quasi working relationship with Harold interrupted by his untimely death in a helicopter crash over in the west Chilcotin.
    https://www.amazon.ca/Fur-Hunters-Fa.../dp/0806133929
    I know its in this book, I have read it but for some reason its not allowing me to go to page 194 and read it once more. If you look in the table of contents you will see 2 references to moose.
    Alexander Ross is credible, as he built ft Okanagan and this book has alot of info from ft kamloops where Ross was employed by the northwest company to explore the upper adams/north thompson etc. He also led 2 snake river expeditions, maybe 3, I cant remember but I have all the journals here, pretty sure he knew what a moose was.

    There were Buffalo running around here too, how do I know? because I found the bones during an excavation and had them looked at by an archeologist and an anthropologist simultaneously. Thats also recorded in journals somewhere, which I probably have here.

    I have also read Eric Collier's book, and I know someone who knew him personally, ya, I will leave it at that.
    To say there were no Moose is abit of a stretch dont you?
    Last edited by 338win mag; 09-12-2019 at 01:51 PM.

  11. #10
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    Re: BC moose hunting history

    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Buffalo View Post
    Surely someone has compiled historical BC moose distribution and density records for the last 150 years.
    Yes, no?
    If not, it is critical that this work is done with urgency.



    I have always found it interesting to hear reports that moose were not present in large areas of BC in the recent past.
    This doesn't make sense as most of BC is decent moose habitat, and begs the question, WHY?

    It seems to me that current concerns of moose declines would benefit by knowing historical distribution and an understanding of causes that extirpated moose from much of BC


    Regarding allocations, this historical information would compose the foundation for an intervenor to support keeping moose accessible to ALL people.
    The same could be said for Whitetail deer around here too, but you know what? All the FN have to do is get on the stand and say whatever they want and it will be believed because its Oral history, even if its bullshit.
    What historical information?

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