Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: Another Newb

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Pitt Meadows
    Posts
    176

    Re: Another Newb

    I consider myself a rookie hunter and have learned a lot over the past year of hunting. Species that you plan to hunt will dictate gear. I started off wanting to hunt every critter possible, which not only consumes a ton of time (wife didn't appreciate that too much) but also costs a lot of money in different gear. For example, I went turkey hunting which I purchased a turkey vest and multiple calls & decoys. My mossberg 12 gauge did great with the turkey choke & shot I paired it with and I was successful. Head to toe camo was critical for this hunt as their eye sight is incredible. I also tried for elk & mule deer, both unsuccessful but my 308 covered these hunts quite well. Camo is optional in these hunts but since I had it I wear it on all hunts, but as stated above its not necessary. I simply went with the 308 as a buddy sold me this with scope for $300 so I couldn't say no. I am going to head out for bear this weekend and I don't think I need much more than my 308 and ammunition plus a couple key items: binos, knife, etc. The selection of rifle though really does come down to animals you plan to hunt, terrain you plan to hunt but most of all preference.

    Good luck, its a fun journey!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Duncan
    Posts
    2,752

    Re: Another Newb

    270 30-06 308 are all in the same ball park recoil wise. Their performance differences will only be revealed beyond most peoples ability to shoot in the field. You should put where you are located in your profile and see if someone with a bunch of guns will bring out to the range. Then you can feel for yourself how they shoot. The recoil from a mild recoiling gun is enough to interfere with developing good shooting habits. It did for me. I would recommend anyone getting into shooting to start with a .22 or a low power air rifle where you can get a ton of trigger time in for very low cost. You can shoot a sub 500 fps air rifle almost anywhere. As for brand and make of firearms, you need to go into the store and handle lots of them. The fit of the stock can really affect how a gun shoots for you. Quickly you will develop a sense for what feels right. This will become more refined as you become a more proficient shooter.As for the rest of your gear. Don't focus on what you think you could need. I would go out and add or subtract gear depending on real needs. You have some very basic needs, being warm and dry, killing an animal, and getting it out of the woods. Figure that out and you are good to go.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nelson, BC
    Posts
    3,713

    Re: Another Newb

    Your choice of the 308 win is wise. It's a great cartridge - accurate, capable and with mild recoil. It's also more efficient than the 30-06 its often compared with - on average, the 30-06 burns ~12% more powder for an ~3% increase in velocity. Plus short action rifles are usually a few ounces lighter. Another great choice would be the 6.5 Creedmoor.
    I won't always be young, but I can be immature forever

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Duncan
    Posts
    2,752

    Re: Another Newb

    One more word of warning, marketers market gear to hunters because success rates are low. Our nature in our society is to buy something that we hope will make us more successful. Truth is success comes from a blending of luck, knowledge, and experience. The people with most knowledge put themselves in the place where they get lucky the most often. That makes them the best hunters. Gear doesn't buy that. Don't get hung up on chasing the gimmicks. Most of them are just marketing bullshit.

    Savages are cheap because their innovative design significantly lowers manufacturing costs. They are a great action to build off of if you are a tinkerer at heart. I say buy it if it feels good in your hands and shoots accurately. as said above, short action rifles are cool. Smaller cartridges are just a bit easier to carry in the field and the rifle often be an inch or two shorter in over all length. It takes a highly experienced and proficient shooter to notice the actual differences in these cartridges when shooting in the field.
    Last edited by brian; 05-16-2019 at 08:42 AM. Reason: more stuffing

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    249

    Re: Another Newb

    Quote Originally Posted by Paulus View Post
    After lots of reading and talking to who ever is somewhat knowledgeable I settled on a .308, mainly for it's recoil, it's big/powerful enough to take anything in BC and it's only downside would be bullet drop.

    As for a rifle? I dunno tbh.
    My instructor raved about a remington 783, but he's a remington fan boy so for whatever that's worth. Then again the price is right, leaves me with funds for a decent scope and all the gear and gas to go out.

    Thoughts and suggestions on calibre and rifle and anything else a newbie needs to know/own are much appreciated.
    Here are my two bits:
    Rifle:
    Do you want to buy a "forever gun" or are you just interested in testing the waters? If you're just interested in testing the waters then any of the "intro gun packages" are all pretty close to each other: Remington 783, Ruger American, Savage, etc. Savage has a mail-in rebate right now and the 783 packages are on sale at places like Italian Sporting Goods. Most gun shops also have a Canada Day sale if you're willing to wait.

    If you're looking for more of a "keep forever" gun, you start around $800 gun only: Tikka, Howa, etc. etc. Then add $500ish for a decent scope, rings, etc. (you can of course go up in price from there).

    You won't seem much difference in terms of accuracy, what you will see is a difference in fit and finish and "feeling of quality".

    In terms of calibre, the "do everything calibres" for BC are .270, 7mm-08, .308, 7mm Mag, and 30-06. On the "high end" of recoil you could also look at the 300 Win Mag and on the low end 6.5mm Creedmoor. They're all pretty close with differences in ammo prices, recoil, ballistics (how far you want to shoot), and energy (how tough the thing you want to shoot is).

    My advice would be:
    The two most important things are fit and recoil (don't choose too powerful a cartridge or you might develop a flinch - .308 is fine) - you want your first gun to be something that you enjoy shooting. Handle, shoulder, fondle a number of guns and see which one fits best. For a scope - look at eye relief (how far away your eye is from the scope in order for you to get a good sight picture - noone likes beaning themselves in the nose) and quality of glass. As a newbie I'd just get a simple duplex reticle (cross hairs) - no need to spend extra for a long range type of scope. Look too at how the scope will mount on the gun and where your cheek rest will be on the stock - does your eye line up with the scope or will you need some sort of cheek riser? Lastly - set aside $100-$200 for other accessories like cleaning, sling, etc.

    If I was starting over I would actually buy 2 guns:
    Buy a CZ in .22 with a simple 4X scope and use that for practice and tasty grouse killing.
    Buy a Tikka in .270 (the 308 has cheaper "practice" ammo, but the 270 has lower recoil) and top it with a Swarovski Z3 (with a duplex reticle these are great value for the quality of glass) or a Leupold VX Freedom if you want need large eye relief (and it's much cheaper)- both in 3X9X40

    The problem is the above is easily $2k once you add in sling, cleaning supplies, and a decent amount of ammo to start.

    If you're on a budget then the Remington 783 package, Savage Axis Package, Ruger American Package (a bit pricier), etc. will get you out and hunting for under $700 all-in if you look around (rifle, scope, ammo, cleaning, taxes, etc.)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    4,775

    Re: Another Newb

    I got a 783 ('06) as a cheap backup to my win m70 ss classic (also '06) and found it to be a bit too short on the stock for me ( I am 6'2" 200lbs).... I also don't like how the bolt seems to come open when traversing rugged terrain.. all that said it is a decent cheap gun... .shoulder rifles you are considering, to ensure the balance/geometry is right for you...it will feel right when you can shoulder it with your eyes closed and be fairly close to target and feel steady when you open.....or at least that is how I do it...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Squamish
    Posts
    4,796

    Re: Another Newb

    Honestly, don't fret about gear. Binoculars and boots are the only things I think you should spend as much as you can on because you will spend more critical time glassing and hiking than you will doing anything else.

    Get a gun, practise with it, then get some mud on your boots. If you love it, the gear will pile up in your garage, trust me.

    First gun, I'd go for a Tikka T3 in 6.5 Creedmoor with a Vortex scope.

    Don't count on shooting something right away. It is called hunting for a reason.

    Have fun, don't be afraid to post questions after giving Youtube a shot.
    Is Justin Competent, or just incompetent?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    3,068

    Re: Another Newb

    What Wild one says is correct :

    "Don’t get overly wrapped up in gear this is the most common mistake made by rookies. When it comes to hunting knowledge of species and habitat is king."

    You can't buy your way into being a good hunter. A lot of us geezers started with a $14.99 Lee Enfield. If I remember right a new Winchester 30-30 cost five times that at the time. I started with a gifted crudely cut-down WWI Ross rifle in 303.

    Getting out there and looking at habitat and figuring out where the animals are in it is what you need way more than the latest 375 Short- magnum Technowhiz rfile with a chrome-vanadium barrel in a hyper-synthoplasmatic stock with a moon-spotting scope on it.
    Last edited by MichelD; 05-16-2019 at 10:58 AM.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    313

    Re: Another Newb

    Damn, you got a lot of awesome advice PDQ.

    1- get an inexpensive 22 - that's what you practice with. Shoot a few bricks of ammo. And keep going back to the 22 to work on form and accuracy. Going straight to a large caliber will really screw you up.

    2- buy a used gun in larger caliber. i have never bought a new rifle. if it shoots straight and you're comfortable with it, it doesn't matter if it has a safe kiss or a scratch or two. it's a tool you're going to carry in the woods. i'm super careful with my stuff but i also realize that my gear (particularly my rifle) is not a trophy that I keep over the mantle and dust off once in a while.

    i practically stole a beautiful Weatherby Mark V in 270 (with a Nikon Monarch scope - great value) because the previous owner carved his name on the bottom of the foreend. The dealer had a hard time selling it. I love that rifle.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Surrey for now
    Posts
    2

    Re: Another Newb

    Wow, thanks guys(/girls?)!
    Too many to address each individually, but in general:
    Updated my location, was already running late for work this morning.

    As for species i'd like to hunt, for now deer and bear. Elk, moose, goat are most likely in my nearish future. Still debating birds and small game.
    Definitely plan on butchering myself.

    Not at all hung up on hunting gear and (marketing) gimmicks, a decent camo top and a back pack is all I'm considering right now.
    The more essential things like binos, a rifle case, sling, cleaning kit, decent scope base and rings, etc add up real quick. And that's just shooting not hunting.

    As for riffle/scope budget, i don't really have one. I'm by no means a cheapskate and fully understand that generally you get what you pay for and buy once, cry once.
    Also i cant imagine anything more annoying and counter productive, especially for a new shooter than a crappy/inconsistent shooting rifle/scope.
    BUT, the less I spend, the less I need to work and the more freedom I have.
    Definitely not shying away from 2nd hand or just paying a fair price for a fair rifle/scope combo.

    As for getting a .22 (lr?), I thought about that, I've seen the advice given other newbies and it allows me to target smaller game.
    Kinda surprised only 2 people brought it up and makes me think maybe not such a popular train of thought???

    Thanks again guys/girls.
    Paul

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •