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Thread: Eurasian or white collared doves

  1. #1
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    Whonnock for 19 years, Mission for 46 years
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    Eurasian or white collared doves

    Has anyone tried Eurasian (white collared) doves? They're an introduced bird rather than
    like the mourning dove and are almost the same size as a band tailed pigeon. From what
    I can gather, like the rock pigeon(dove), they aren't protected by our hunting regulations.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Kamloops
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    Re: Eurasian or white collared doves

    Tried eating or hunting? Eating Im gunna go out on a limb and say tastes like.......turtle......dove.. har har har. Hunting them would be more of a challenge, all the above mentioned birds tend to hang out within city limits and people yards, a few times of seen doves pidgoens on train tracks but still close to town. A really quiet air gun and a bird feeder might work, but I didnt say that.
    edit: Eurasian/white collared doves are not listed as a class C animal so not sure on the legality of shooting them.
    Last edited by Firstblood; 06-10-2018 at 05:19 PM.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    467

    Re: Eurasian or white collared doves

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Lew View Post
    Has anyone tried Eurasian (white collared) doves? They're an introduced bird rather than
    like the mourning dove and are almost the same size as a band tailed pigeon. From what
    I can gather, like the rock pigeon(dove), they aren't protected by our hunting regulations.
    They are a federal Jurisdiction. You would need a migratory license, and more importantly an open season. That I am aware of, there is presently no open season on them.

  5. #4
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    Location
    Kamloops, BC
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    1,465

    Re: Eurasian or white collared doves

    Yes, unfortunately the Feds screwed up and put these under the migratory bird act (which they are not, they setup shop and don't leave) and not as an invasive species (which they really are) and thus are NOT schedule C and would require an open season, which I believe they are putting in for 3 regions in this years regs. Not 100% sure on needing the migratory bird license though as suggested above. In reality, yes, they should be schedule c as an invasive species and should be taken out whenever/wherever possible.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    287

    Re: Eurasian or white collared doves

    According to the Federal Game Warden they are protected. The Provincial CO Service Says they were introduced in the early 80s and here is what the Provincial regs. say.
    Species Responsible for Management
    Federal law does not protect species which were introduced to North America by man, i.e. not native to this continent. There include Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), English Sparrows (Passer domesticus) and Mynahs (Acridotheres cristatellus). Birds not falling under federal jurisdiction within Canada include grouse, quail, pheasants, ptarmigan, hawks, owls, eagles, falcons, cormorants, pelicans, crows and jays. All other birds are considered Federal and therefore protected.

    Clear as mud now people.
    I shoot a "Girly Gun" a lil' ol' 45-70
    "I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and the pig likes it."

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    287

    Re: Eurasian or white collared doves

    Quote Originally Posted by russm86 View Post
    Yes, unfortunately the Feds screwed up and put these under the migratory bird act (which they are not, they setup shop and don't leave) and not as an invasive species (which they really are) and thus are NOT schedule C and would require an open season, which I believe they are putting in for 3 regions in this years regs. Not 100% sure on needing the migratory bird license though as suggested above. In reality, yes, they should be schedule c as an invasive species and should be taken out whenever/wherever possible.
    As do Canadas in many regions. Go figure.
    I shoot a "Girly Gun" a lil' ol' 45-70
    "I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and the pig likes it."

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,994

    Re: Eurasian or white collared doves

    Eurasian Collared Dove

    Post comments
    Regulation Number :
    2018-0-04


    Status:
    Proposed


    Region:
    Region 3 - Thompson
    Region 4 - Kootenay
    Region 8 - Okanagan


    Regulation Type:
    General Open Season


    Species:
    Eurasian Collared Dove


    Closing Date:
    Friday, February 16, 2018 - 23:45


    Decision Statement:
    Pending



    Current Regulations:
    There are currently no open seasons for Eurasian collared dove in British Columbia.
    There are current Sept 1-30 general open seasons for mourning dove in the Thompson, Kootenay, and Okanagan Regions.




    Proposed Regulations:
    Implement general open seasons for Eurasian collared dove wherever a general open season for mourning dove exists; Sept 1-30 in the Thompson, Kootenay, and Okanagan Regions.



    Rationale:
    The Eurasian collared dove (ECDO) is an invasive, alien, non-migratory, species that originated in temperate areas from southeastern Europe across Asia to Japan. It has proven to be one of the great avian colonisers having expanded its range across all of Europe and, after being accidentally introduced to the Bahamas in the 1970’s, has now spread into North and South America, including Canada. In BC, we were first aware of some escaped cage birds in the Keremeos area in the early 1990s. Recently these doves have undergone a major expansion and now have been found across the southern half of the province and as far north in BC as Dease Lake (BC Breeding Bird Atlas; E-Bird). Currently, in addition to BC, they also occur in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario, and we have also heard reports that they are in the Yukon.
    In BC, we currently have open seasons for our two native Columbiformes – Band-tailed Pigeons and Mourning Doves. As there are some conservation concerns for these species, seasons and bag limits are conservative.
    EDCO are similar in appearance to mourning dove, and hunters may have difficulty distinguishing the two species. In order to remove confusion, and provide some measure of population controlled for invasive ECDO populations, the seasons for mourning dove and EDCO are being proposed to coincide in both season length and location.
    EDCO are jointly managed between Provincial and Federal governments, and the two jurisdictions are working together in moving this proposal forward.



    This is a proposed season for this year.

    BHB
    Quote Originally Posted by BiG Boar View Post
    Are you M or F? Might get more takers with tits.

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